Hydromorphone hydrochloride | Opioid drug for analgesia

Hydromorphone hydrochloride is a pure opioid agonist with the principal therapeutic activity of analgesia. A significant feature of the analgesia is that it can occur without loss of consciousness. 
A significant feature of the analgesia is that it can occur without loss of consciousness.



Opioid analgesics also suppress the cough reflex and may cause respiratory depression, mood changes, mental clouding, euphoria, dysphoria, nausea, vomiting and electroencephalographic changes. Many of the effects described below are common to the class of mu-opioid analgesics, which includes morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, and fentanyl

Central Nervous System

The precise mode of analgesic action of opioid analgesics is unknown. However, specific CNS opiate receptors have been identified. Opioids are believed to express their pharmacological effects by combining with these receptors. Hydromorphone depresses the cough reflex by direct effect on the cough center in the medulla.

Hydromorphone produces respiratory depression by direct effect on brain stem respiratory centers. The mechanism of respiratory depression also involves a reduction in the responsiveness of the brain stem respiratory centers to increases in carbon dioxide tension.
Hydromorphone causes miosis. Pinpoint pupils are a common sign of opioid overdose but are not pathognomonic (e.g., pontine lesions of hemorrhagic or ischemic origin may produce similar findings)

Gastrointestinal Tract and Other Smooth Muscle

Gastric, biliary and pancreatic secretions are decreased by opioids such as hydromorphone. Hydromorphone causes a reduction in motility associated with an increase in tone in the gastric antrum and duodenum. Digestion of food in the small intestine is delayed and propulsive contractions are decreased. Propulsive peristaltic waves in the colon are decreased, and tone may be increased to the point of spasm. The end result is constipation. Hydromorphone can cause a marked increase in biliary tract pressure as a result of spasm of the sphincter of Oddi.

Cardiovascular System




Hydromorphone may produce hypotension as a result of either peripheral vasodilation, release of histamine, or both. Other manifestations of histamine release and/or peripheral vasodilation may include pruritus, flushing, and red eyes.
Effects on the myocardium after intravenous administration of opioids are not significant in normal persons, vary with different opioid analgesic agents and vary with the hemodynamic state of the patient, state of hydration and sympathetic drive.

Pregnancy and Nursing Mothers
Hydromorphone crosses the placenta. Hydromorphone is also found in low levels in breast milk, and may cause respiratory compromise in newborns when administered during labor or delivery.

Indications and usage

Hydromorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets are indicated for the management of pain in opioid-tolerant patients severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate.
Patients considered opioid tolerant are those who are receiving, for one week or longer, at least 60 mg oral morphine per day, 25 mcg transdermal fentanyl/hour, 30 mg oral oxycodone/day, 8 mg oral hydromorphone/day, 25 mg oral oxymorphone/day or an equianalgesic dose of another opioid.

Limitations of Use

• Because of the risks of addiction, abuse, and misuse with opioids, even at recommended doses, and because of the greater risks of overdose and death with extended-release opioid formulations, reserve hydromorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets for use in patients for whom alternative treatment options (e.g., non-opioid analgesics or immediate-release opioids) are ineffective, not tolerated, or would be otherwise inadequate to provide sufficient management of pain.
• Hydromorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets are not indicated as an as-needed (prn) analgesic.

Contraindications

Contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to hydromorphone.
Contraindicated in patients with respiratory depression in the absence of resuscitative equipment and in patients with status asthmaticus.
Contraindicated for use in obstetrical analgesia.
Contraindicated in patients who are not already receiving large amounts of opioids.



Reference
https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/hydromorphone-hydrochloride
https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=0f522b18-ce6d-4fc7-8bc7-5b2ea2dd3840
https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d00255a1
https://www.fda.gov/media/88839/download
https://www.rxlist.com/dilaudid-drug.htm
https://bnf.nice.org.uk/drug/hydromorphone-hydrochloride.html
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00980798
https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/product/1018/smpc
https://www.nps.org.au/medicine-finder/dilaudid-tablets
https://www.jpsmjournal.com/article/S0885-3924(01)00364-5/fulltext

Post a comment

0 Comments